Browse Items (105 total)

  • Collection: Historical Manuscripts

Three women talk behind a table laden with books. Additional boxes sit on the ground under the table. Two signs sit on an easel to the right of the table.  The one on the left is white. There is a section that reads "1st THINGS 1st" and the bottom of the sign reads "BOOKS FOR WOMEN FE-MAIL ORDER HOUSE". The sign to the right has an image of Sojourner Truth against a red background with illegible writing on it. There is a parking lot in the background with buses and people walking around.
Photo of a First Things First Books for Women table at an event in Washington, D.C.

A woman, Susan Sojourner, walks across a hand-crafted, wooden plank bridge in a wooded area. She is holding a glass bottle drink and papers in one arm and is smiling at the camera. She is wearing boots, pants, a sweater, and coat.
Susan Sojourner in Holmes County, Mississippi.

Handwritten poem called bucking for a raise<br />
<br />
but dear<br />
he's got a<br />
PhD<br />
10 years less experience<br />
and the right thing dangling <br />
between his legs...<br />
<br />
couldn't expect someone <br />
with one of those<br />
to live on 12 thousand <br />
dollars a year...<br />
<br />
after all, <br />
care and feeding one of them<br />
danglies<br />
must be a whole lot more than for<br />
your six-year-old.<br />
<br />
Susan Sojourner<br />
8 October 1978
A poem written by Susan Sojourner on the topic of the gender pay gap between men and women in the workforce.

Typed poem called THE BOTTOM LINE KEEPS MOVING LOWER DOWN<br />
<br />
to judy bee<br />
assistant to the director<br />
or even assistant director:<br />
<br />
is it the nature of the job<br />
or of the overseers<br />
that makes us women-under-men<br />
be always seen over?<br />
<br />
our work is always <br />
subsumed<br />
under their names - - <br />
Even When We Get To Sign Our Own<br />
at the bottom.<br />
<br />
and, the bottom line<br />
has a funny way of <br />
moving down<br />
once a woman's name is on it.<br />
<br />
susan sojourner <br />
24  may 1978
A poem written by Susan Sojourner on the expectations on women in the workforce.

Typed poem titled motherhood<br />
<br />
is disbelieving <br />
that you're really<br />
old enough or wise<br />
or together enough<br />
to be<br />
left<br />
alone <br />
with this life.<br />
<br />
susan sojourner<br />
april 1977
A poem written by Susan Sojourner on her thoughts about motherhood.

Typed poem<br />
<br />
Malechildren get in the way<br />
of serious feminists<br />
especially lesbian-feminists:<br />
(line break)<br />
I get depressed <br />
when I think of the future.<br />
<br />
I get depressed <br />
when I think.<br />
<br />
I get depressed.<br />
<br />
Today with my baby<br />
I realize that<br />
Tomorrow and tomorrow<br />
he'll be bigger and bigger, <br />
more manly every day...<br />
<br />
the enemy.<br />
<br />
NO!<br />
<br />
a greek tragedy<br />
in a 1978 world.<br />
<br />
clytemnestra mama susan (sojourner)<br />
22 june 1978
A poem written by Susan Sojourner on her thoughts towards lesbian-feminist separatism against mothers who have sons.

Page 1 of a typed poem titled getting gay<br />
<br />
unlike coming out -- <br />
a political stance<br />
zeroes in<br />
on the totally personal <br />
part<br />
being a self acknowledgement<br />
of one's gayness<br />
getting gay <br />
a self acceptance<br />
acceptance of self<br />
a getting ones self<br />
together on another level <br />
of consciousness<br />
<br />
a level of consciousness <br />
--a gate to expansion<br />
each time i've reached<br />
a new level<br />
it caused total<br />
re-examination of my past<br />
in the light of this new level<br />
<br />
just as getting gay is<br />
a swinging in closer to the personal<br />
--another different closer to self<br />
level of the coming out process
A poem written by Susan Sojourner on the topics of sexuality, self-identity, and social justice.

Page 1 of typed poem titled claudia<br />
<br />
claudia didn't get fired for being a lesbian though the idea certainly disgusted george her immediate "superior" harold the personnel director and christina her old college chum whose belief that such proclivities were unhealthy was shared by her colleagues.<br />
<br />
claudia did not get fired for being too fat overweight to the point of massive<br />
<br />
though the chairman knew something was wrong with the new girl being assigned to the front office right outside his door (with senior staff men grimacing in joking astonishment at her size).<br />
<br />
and claudia didn't get fired for being a psychic hearing other voices seeing auras <br />
<br />
she only brought that to the office when asked -- they'd arrange a session over lunch in an empty office (for pay) (a professional psychic).<br />
<br />
but it was only with believers and not the reason claudia was fired.
A poem written by Susan Sojourner about a lesbian female worker named Claudia who was fired from her job.

Black and white photo of an exhibit in an indoor atrium about 1960s Holmes County, Mississippi and the civil rights movement, taken by Susan Sojourner. There are people gathering around a table in the background.<br />
<br />
There is a hanging banner that reads "The Some People Of That Place. 1960s Holmes County, Mississippi:  The Local Black People and Their Civil Rights Movement."
Black and white photo of an exhibit about 1960s Holmes County, Mississippi and the civil rights movement, taken by Susan Sojourner.

typed in memoriam poem titled for miz hamer* who just died<br />
<br />
fannie lou a woman who knew and flew sang and grew pained and knew more and more and more <br />
<br />
and as she grew we also knew but never more than she-- who sparked and flamed spoke and rang and pushed on and on and on through ruleville sunflower the delta and all of mississip up to congers to stake her claim<br />
<br />
so grand and fine big broad warm black bold strong -- miz hamer was her name<br />
<br />
we were glad enriched and full inspired by her being her voice her smile her heart her style her being fannie lou the woman who knew and flew sang and grew pained and knew more and more and more...<br />
<br />
susan sojourner<br />
march/june 1977<br />
<br />
*Fannie Lou Hamer was a black plantation worker then SNCC & civil rights leader dynamic orator & singer, she was one of three Mississippi Freedom Democrats put forward in 1965 to sit in the U.S. Congress instead of the "duly elected" white officials. She was born and raised in Ruleville, Sunflower County, Mississippi where she died in March 1977.
An in memoriam poem about Fannie Lou Hamer, written by Susan Sojourner.
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